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Annual Report 2013-2014

Martha’s Vineyard

Public Charter School

 

Annual Report

2013-2014



August 1, 2014


Contact Information:


                                    Address:                                  424 State Rd. 

                                                                                    P.O. Box 1150

                                                                                    West Tisbury, MA  02575

 

                                    Telephone:                              508-693-9900

 

                                    Fax:                                         508-696-9008

 

                                    Website:                                  www.mvpcs.org

 

                                    Contact:                                  Robert M. Moore, Director

 

                                    Email:                                      bmoore@mvpcs.org

                                                           



Table of Contents

Introduction to the School 2

Letter from the Director. 3

School Performance and Program Implementation. 4

Faithfulness to Charter. 4

Accountability Plan Objectives and Measures. 4

Charter School Performance Criteria relating to Faithfulness to Charter. 5

Mission and Key Design Elements. 5

Amendments to the Charter. 5

Recruitment and Retention Plan 2014-2015. 6

Dissemination Efforts. 11

Academic Program Success. 12

Accountability Plan Objectives and Measures. 12

Charter School Performance Criteria Relating To Academic Success. 13

Student Performance. 13

Program Delivery. 13

Organizational Viability. 14

Accountability Plan Objectives and Measures. 14

Charter School Performance Criteria Relating to Organizational Viability. 15

Complaints. 15

Budget and Finance Reports. 15

Additional Information. 16

Appendix C: School and Student Data Tables. 16

Appendix D: Additional Required Information. 18

Attachment A.. 20

Attachment B. 23

Attachment C. 25

 

 

 

 

Introduction to the School

 

                                   

Name of School : Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School

Type of Charter

 

Commonwealth

Location

West Tisbury

Regional or Non-Regional

Regional

Districts in Region

(if applicable)

5

Year Opened

1996

Year(s) Renewed

(if applicable)

2001, 2006, 2011

Maximum Enrollment

180

Current Enrollment

180

Chartered Grade Span

K-12

Students on Waitlist

112

# of Instructional Days

during the

2013-2014 school year

180

Current Grade Span

K- 12

School Hours

8:15 - 3:15

Age of School

18

Mission Statement: It is the mission of the Martha's Vineyard Public Charter School to create a public school that will cultivate lifelong learners in a multi-aged, project-based setting.  Within an environment, that models interdependence as the foundation of society: the individual student will learn to direct his/her own learning, the group will make decisions together and recognize the unique contributions of each member, the community will support and interact with the school body.

 


 

 

 

Letter from the Director

 

 

The Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School graduated five students from its high school on June 1, 2014. One of the graduates has been enrolled in the school since kindergarten.  All five students intend to further their education.

 

The school experienced the second year of the DESE professional evaluation system, began to implement the District Determined Measures to assess teacher impact on student learning, and under the supervision and coordination of the school’s Adjustment Counselor the school implemented a new Child Study Team protocol. The school administration is pleased with the status of these three initiatives and is looking to move each one forward during the upcoming school year.

 

The school made preparations for the upcoming PARCC assessments as it piloted the test at two grade levels. It is the school’s intention to further its preparations to ensure that each student experiences success.

 

The school welcomed its 18th year site visit team on May 1. We have already begun to address its four major recommendations. The recommendations include a better understanding on the part of teachers of the Child Study protocol and instructional strategies to reach desired outcomes, an alignment to Common Core across the curriculum, and an array of strategies to inform the Board of Trustees of the school’s academic progress. The administration has begun discussions with the Teachers and Board of Trustees regarding the recommendations. A plan will be put in place to implement these recommendations during the 2014-2015 school. As well, the school will begin preparations for their five-year charter renewal site visit expected to take place during the 2015-2016 school year.

 

The school continues its mission to provide a valuable public school option for families on Martha’s Vineyard by nurturing life-long learners through a multi-age setting in a project based learning environment.

 

Robert M. Moore

Director

 

 

 

 

School Performance and Program Implementation


“It is the mission of the MVPCS to create a public school that will cultivate lifelong learners in a multi-aged, project based setting....Education is most meaningful when the student is invested in the studies by choice.  The curriculum evolves out of student needs and student choice in conjunction with the MA Curriculum Frameworks.... At the core of the MVPCS’ educational program is the belief that self-directed learning is the deepest learning.  The educational program of the MVPCS is designed to empower students to learn how to direct their own learning while sharing in the community’s resources.  An environment of mutual respect is fostered where success is applauded and mistakes can be made during the daily learning process.”  MVPCS Charter

 

Faithfulness to Charter

Accountability Plan Objectives and Measures

 

 

2013-2014 Performance

(Met/Partially Met/Not Met)

Evidence

Objective:  The school is faithful to the mission, vision and educational philosophy defined in the charter application and any subsequent approved amendments. 

Measure: Every classroom will thoroughly explore, in developmentally appropriate ways, the definition and meaning of each right and pillar during the first month of school.

Met

A variety of activities including skits, books and posters were used. A variety of activities occurred school wide to introduce and/ or review the rights and pillars with every student in every classroom.

 

Measure: The rights and pillars will be posted in every classroom.

Met

The rights and pillars are posted in every classroom.

Measure: In school and out of school suspensions will be less than ten per year as a result of students’ understandings of their rights and responsibilities.

 

Met

There were 3
suspensions during the school year.

Objective: The school establishes an academic program that includes the pedagogical approach, curriculum, assessment, and other unique elements defined in the charter application and any subsequent approved amendments.

 

Measure: Ninety percent of the students exhibit their work according to the exhibition criteria.

 

Met

Ninety-three percent of students exhibited their work according to exhibition criteria.

 

Measure: Data from the “Charter Learner Assessment Tool” indicate that more than 75% of students at the end of their two-year-cycle in a particular classroom have achieved Apprentice or Practitioner levels in each of the categories (self-directed, interdependent, complex thinker, project-based and democratic community member.)

Met

More than 88% of students at the end of their two year cycle in a particular classroom achieved Apprentice or Practitioner levels in each of the categories on the Charter Learner Assessment Tool. 

 

 

Charter School Performance Criteria relating to Faithfulness to Charter

 

Mission and Key Design Elements

 

The Martha's Vineyard Public Charter School has shown that individualized and carefully monitored progress can be attained in a public school.

 

Specific adaptable innovations of the MVPCS include the following:

 

• Community interaction and service

• Student-driven curriculum

• Flexible block scheduling

• Real projects from meaningful practical themes

• Authentic assessment

• Collaborative teaching and learning

• Democratic governance

• Multiage grouping

• Parent, student, and teacher partnerships (PEP- Personal Education Plan)

 

The multiage, project-based school envisioned by the school’s founders 18 years ago in the initial charter application continues to be the foundation of the school, its daily work, and the five-year Strategic Plan adopted by the board in 2010 for the school years 2010-2015.

 

The teachers work with the students to develop their skills and understandings in becoming life-long learners. This process includes integrating the students’ passions and interests in authentic, project-based experiences and allowing students numerous opportunities to exhibit and discuss their work with their classmates and members of the school community.

 

The Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School has held true to its belief that every child deserves a caring, respectful and supportive environment in which to learn and grow each day.  This educational philosophy begins with the recognition of each individual, his or her talents and unique abilities and further includes the importance of community and interdependence. The school day begins with “Morning Meeting” bringing together the whole community in a significant, but short, few moments to acknowledge the accomplishments of individuals, as well as the community as a whole. The teaching and learning in the classroom is of a constructivist approach; integrating the curriculum with the students’ interests and the academic requirements through the differentiation of instruction.

 

Amendments to the Charter

 

No amendments to the Charter were made during the 2013-2014 school year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recruitment and Retention Plan 2014-2015

Recruitment Plan

2014 – 2015

 

School Name: Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School

Date: July 10, 2014

 

Summary of the Implementation of the 2013-2014 Retention Plan

 

 

 

A variety of recruitment strategies were implemented during the school year. Special Education staff attended the Enrollment Open House.  Special Education teachers were available to meet with prospective families.  The school’s ELL Coordinator attended the annual Enrollment Open House.  The Application for Enrollment, a school brochure and other enrollment documents were translated into the dominant second language on Martha’s Vineyard, which is Portuguese. The ELL coordinator was available to meet with prospective families when they visited the school. An extremely well-attended workshop for English as a Second language households took place at the school and translated enrollment information was distributed there. 

Prominent members of the Brazilian community on Martha’s Vineyard offered to post the school’s enrollment brochure on their Facebook pages.  The school’s brochure was also posted on community bulletin boards and at other public places. Administrators reached out to all pre-schools including low income pre-schools to inform parents about the school.

Administrators made phone calls to guidance counselors from sending districts in January to remind them about our open house and to invite them to send students and their families to the open house.  A letter from the Director was mailed home to all families in the sending district describing the school’s program and the fact that it is open to all students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General recruitment activities

Recruitment activities are continuous throughout the year.  Beginning in September, the school advertises weekly “Visiting Days” in the local newspapers and in posters that are posted on community bulletin boards and at the many preschools on the island.  These Visiting Days occur whenever interested families ask for them.  When families visit the school, they have a tour of the school and they meet with the Director and other administrators who describe the school’s history, program and educational philosophy. Families are encouraged to ask questions and to contact the school with additional questions and to visit a classroom for a more extended time, if desired. 

 

The school advertises the Open House in the local papers and community bulletin boards and at the pre-schools throughout the island. The Open House takes place during the last week in January. At the Open House, prospective families meet the grade level teachers and visit the classrooms to learn about the educational program available at the school. 

 

Throughout the year, articles about the school are written in the local papers.  These articles serve to familiarize the wider island community with the accomplishments and activities that occur at the MVPCS.

 
































As per the CHART data, several of the school’s subgroups fall below the comparison index.  MVPCS is committed to closing this gap with a variety of enhanced strategies listed below. 

 

Recruitment Plan –Strategies

List strategies for recruitment activities for each demographic group.

Demographic Group

Strategies

Special Education students

Goal: To increase enrollment of Special Education students.

Have school Special Education staff attend the Enrollment Open House.

Parent representatives from the Special Education Parent Advisory Council (PAC) attend the annual      Enrollment Open House.

The Right to Attend document regarding special education will be provided to each applicant.

 

Make sure Special Education staff are available to meet with families during school tours.

Administrators will build up participation of parents in the PAC by hosting beginning of the year activities.

Enhanced strategies:

Maintain a Special Education section on our website.

The school recently expanded its Special Education department and a Special Education staff member will be present at all special events and functions at the school.

Work with the regional school district to obtain accurate lists of all students and their addresses for mailings.

 

 

Limited English-proficient students

The school’s ELL Coordinator will attend the annual Enrollment Open House.

Translate the Application for Enrollment and other enrollment documents into the dominant second language on Martha’s Vineyard, which is Portuguese.

Make sure the ELL coordinator is available to meet with families during school tours.

Distribute translated notices of the Open House and Visiting Days.

Enhanced strategies:

Have the school Director meet with Brazilian (the most prominent ELL demographic in our sending district) church leaders and congregations.

Host a community dinner at the school featuring Brazilian food.

Provide information on the Brazilian Community Facebook pages about our school.

  

5.  Invite the Brazilian community to special events at the school that promote awareness of the fact that the MVPCS is a free and public school choice.

Students eligible for free or reduced lunch

Make enrollment information accessible in public places such as food pantries, churches and libraries.

 

Reach out to low income pre-schools to inform parents about the school.

 

Enhanced strategies:

Continue to make the application for free/reduced lunch easily accessible to all families by having it available on the school’s website, mailed in the summer mailing, and reminding families, through the weekly director’s bulletin, that the application is available.  Include that we offer free/reduced lunch in all our marketing information.

 

 

 

Students who are sub-proficient

Contact all guidance counselors from sending districts in January, prior to the Open House to suggest that they invite families of students who are sub proficient to the Open House.

Mail a letter home to families in the sending district that describes that the school is public and open to all on a first come first serve basis, allowing for district cap restrictions.

 

 

Students at risk of dropping out of school

Meet with guidance counselors from the sending district High School to indentify particular students who might benefit from our school and contact those families that are suggested.

 

 

Students who have dropped out of school

Contact Department of Children and Families, parole officers and the YMCA to connect with youth who have dropped out of school. Distribute information about the high school program to the leaders in those organizations.

Other subgroups of students who should be targeted to eliminate the achievement gap

 

Contact and distribute information about the MVPCS and enrollment information to the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah.

 

 

 

Retention Plan

2014 – 2015

 

Summary of retention strategies from 2013-2014 Retention Plan

 

Implementation Summary:

 

The Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School is committed to retaining students and families.  A number of structures are in place to help achieve that goal.  The academic program is designed to be both challenging and meaningful. Innovative and unique educational activities are included in the curriculum such as an artists-in-residence program for Kindergarten through grade eight students and a mentorship program in the high school. Support personnel are numerous throughout the building. The low student / teacher ratio ensures that each student is cared for and that no student is neglected.  Every student has an advisor, who is a teacher who meets with him or her regularly throughout the school year to refine and define that student’s academic and non-academic goals.  The advisor, parent and student meet regularly.

 

 

Overall Student Retention Goal

Annual goal for student retention (percentage):

 

95%

 

The school’s attrition rate is equal to or above the third quartile of comparison schools.  We are a K-12 school and many of our eighth graders leave us for the Regional high school.  This is mainly due to sports; we are too small to have our own teams and our students cannot play for the Regional district.  If we did not include these eighth grade students, we believe MVPCS would be in line with comparable schools in our district.  That being said, we are forming many club sports teams to entice many of these students to stay, but it remains a difficult challenge.

 

 

Retention Plan –Strategies

List strategies for retention activities for each demographic group.

Demographic Group

Strategies

Special Education students

 

The school will provide a variety of supports for all students, including students with Special Needs.  These supports will include:  teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the Special Education Administrator and families with students with special needs; support personnel will be present in every classroom throughout the school; homework club will take place at least two times per week for Grades 3-8; teachers will regularly participate in Child Study meetings to discuss particular students’ needs and next steps.

Limited English-proficient students

The school will provide a variety of supports for all students, including limited English-proficient students.  These supports will include:  teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the ELL Coordinator and families; support personnel will be present in every classroom throughout the school; teachers will receive ELL training; homework club will take place at least two times per week for Grades 5-12; teachers will regularly participate in Child Study meetings to discuss particular students’ needs and next steps.

Students eligible for free or reduced lunch

The school will provide a variety of supports for all students, including students eligible for free or reduced lunch.  These supports will include:  teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the administrator in charge of the free/reduced lunch program and the families; support personnel will be present in every classroom throughout the school; free homework club will take place at least two times per week for Grades 5-12; other free after school activities will take place during the school year.

Students who are sub-proficient

The school will provide a variety of supports for all students, including students who are sub-proficient. These supports will include:  teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the Director and the Special Education teachers and families with students who are sub-proficient; Response to Intervention program will continue to be implemented in the lower grades along with differentiation of instruction throughout the school;  support personnel will be present in every classroom throughout the school; homework club will take place at least two times per week for Grades 5-12; teachers will regularly participate in Child Study meetings to discuss particular students’ needs and next steps.

Students at risk of dropping out of school

The school will provide a variety of supports for all students, including students who are at risk for dropping out. These supports will include teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the Director and the Director of Special Education (if applicable) and families with students who are at risk for dropping out.  The school will continue to differentiate instruction.  Teachers will regularly participate in Child Study meetings to discuss particular students’ needs and next steps.

Students who have dropped out of school

The school did not have any students enrolled in this sub-group during the 2013-14 school year. Supports will include teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the Director and the Special Education Administrator (if applicable) and families; and differentiation of instruction.  Teachers will regularly participate in Child Study meetings to discuss particular students’ needs and next steps.

Other subgroups of students who should be targeted to eliminate the achievement gap

 

Supports will include teacher/advisors for each student; home/school connection between the Director and the Special Education Administrator (if applicable) and families; and differentiation of instruction.  Teachers will regularly participate in Child Study meetings to discuss particular students’ needs and next steps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dissemination Efforts

  1. The Middle School and High School Robotics team shared their work at a presentation at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell.  The Robotics teacher shared her work with a science teacher at the local high school.

  2. A number of teaches collaborated professionally with colleagues throughout the Martha’s Vineyard School District and the Commonwealth in the areas of Common Core Standards Implementation, English Language Learners, RETELL trainings, School Librarians, Spanish Teachers, Reading Teachers, Graduate School studies, Famer to School Initiatives, Special Needs Leadership Conferences, and Response to Intervention Leadership Groups

  3. A teacher attended a national conference on Locally Grown Schools.

  4. The school hosted 20 educators from the Cultural Arts Academy Charter School  in Brooklyn, NY.

  5. The 2014 summer school was held in the West Tisbury Public Library.

  6. Our High School students interviewed clients at an island elderly housing building to write their biographies.

  7. High School students presented their portfolios to outside experts.

  8. Fifth and Sixth grade students helped run an Energy Carnival at a local elementary school that was attended by over 500 students from the sending districts.

  9. The school hosted the Brazilian Consulate and two hundred residents from Brazil to work on government documents (Passports, driver’s licenses, visas, etc.)

  10. Grade five and six students participated in the island wide solar car race organized by a charter school teacher.

  11. The charter school hosted fifteen students and two teachers from a high school in Spain for even days.

  12. Teacher chaperones collaborated and shared best practices with educators in San Giovanni Val D’Arno during the 8th grade trip to Italy.

 

Academic Program Success

Accountability Plan Objectives and Measures

 

 

2013 - 2014 Performance

(Met/Partially Met/Not Met)

Evidence

Objective: Students at the school demonstrate proficiency, or progress toward meeting proficiency targets on state standards, as measured by the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) exams in all subject areas and at all grade levels tested for accountability purposes

Measure: The school shows an annual increase in the CPI in ELA and mathematics in the aggregate and for all statistically significant subgroups.

 

Met

 

The CPI for ELA in 2012 was 91.2 and in 2013 it was 93.8. The CPI for mathematics in 2012 was 81.1 and in 2013 it was 85.8.

 

Objective: The school achieves and maintains a median student growth percentile (SGP) of 40 or higher in the aggregate and for all statistically significant sub-groups in all subject areas tested for accountability purposes.

 

 

Measure: Each year, the median student growth percentile is 40 or higher in the aggregate and in all statistically significant sub-groups in all subject areas tested for accountability purposes.

Met

 

The median student growth in 2012 was 67.5 in ELA and 62 in Mathematics.

 

Objective: Each year, the school makes cumulative PPI greater than 75%.

 

Measure: Each year, the school makes a cumulative PPI greater than 75%.

 

 

Not Met

The school’s cumulative PPI was 73% in 2013.

Objective:  Student performance is strong and demonstrates improvement as indicated by the Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School’s Internal Assessment Instrument in the curricular areas of Math and English Arts.

 

Measure:  A minimum of 80% of students reach Apprentice or Practitioner levels in math and English language arts as indicated by the Internal Assessment Instrument at the end of their two year cycle in a classroom (Grades 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10.)

Met in all grades in ELA; Not Met in Math

A minimum of 80% of students in English Internal Assessments and 69% in Math Internal Assessments reached Apprentice or Practitioner levels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charter School Performance Criteria Relating To Academic Success

 

Student Performance

The link to the Report Card for the Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School published by the DESE is below:

 

http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/reportcard/rc.aspx?linkid=37&orgcode=04660550&fycode=2013&orgtypecode=6&

 

Eighty percent of all students in grades 3-8 and 10 scored Proficient or Advanced in English language arts on MCAS in 2013 and sixty nine percent scored Proficient or Advanced in Mathematics.  The CPI, PPI and SGP did not reflect enough progress over time.

 

The teachers performed item-by-item analyses of test results and worked closely with students all year to ensure student growth and improved achievement.  The school adopted the Singapore Math curriculum in the 2012-2013 school year, which is aligned with the Common Core Standards as well as the MCAS.

 

Program Delivery

Data collected through a variety of assessments regarding student achievement is analyzed and discussed by teachers, specialists and administrators. MCAS results, Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluations (GRADE), Writing Rubrics, Renaissance Math Assessments, and DRA evaluations provided data on each student in ELA and Math skills and understandings.

The school has seen growth in the development of Math skills and understandings and continues to address needs in these areas through support both in and out of the classroom. English Language Arts data indicates much success throughout the school. As in Math, student needs are addressed in small groups and/or one-on-one setting. A new Child Study protocol was implemented during the 2013-2014 school year to more comprehensively assess and address the needs of diverse learners throughout the school. Literature and math supports are in place to assist all our learners and we have a team of three licensed Direct Service personnel to coordinate the instructional strategies for students on Individual Education Plans and 504s.

Frequent meetings are held with all the professional to continually receive updates on the status of all learners.

 

 

 

Organizational Viability

Accountability Plan Objectives and Measures

 

 

 

 

 

2013 - 2014 Performance

(Met/Partially Met/Not Met)

Evidence

Objective: The school develops an annual budget that can be sustained by                 enrollment and is in support of student academic achievement.

 

Measure: The school’s annual budget is sustained by its enrollment.

 

Met

The annual budget is developed to ensure that the school’s programs are fully funded to meet our educational goals.  The fiscal 2014 budget reflected the student enrollment of 180 with increases to support staff to match the needs of the student population.  The budget for fiscal 2015 includes a salary increase for teachers and staff and additions to our guidance and support staff positions to support academic goals.

 

Objective:  The school demonstrates a history of positive net assets, adequate cash flow to sustain operations and support the academic program, and consistently operates within budget

 

Measure: Each year, the school demonstrates a history of positive net assets, adequate cash flow to sustain operations and support the academic program, and consistently operates within budget.

 

Met

The 2014 fiscal year ended with a surplus of about 2.2%.  This was due to the mix of siblings entering our school which resulted in some extra one time income for us.   The approved budget for 2015 continues to fund the school’s academic and physical space needs

and it is anticipated that 2015 will be a year of adequate cash flow and a stable reserve account.

 

 

 

 

Objective: The school’s annual independent audit is free of material or repeated findings.

 

Measure: There is an absence of material or repeated audit findings in annual audits by qualified independent auditor.

 

Met

 

The school has undergone a full annual audit from Powers and Sullivan, Certified Public

Accountants of Woburn MA, every year since 1996 and has had a clean audit report every year with no material or repeated findings.  The Fiscal 2014 audit is scheduled for Sept. 3, 2014 and will be submitted to the State on time.

 

Objective: The school implements the student recruitment, retention, and enrollment process intended in the charter, in the school’s recruitment and retention plans, and as defined by statute and regulations.

 

Measure: Each year, student applications to available openings average a 2:1 ratio.

 

Met

 

The school has met the measure as the school had 45 applicants and 22 openings.

Measure: The five-year average of the annual student retention rate in Kindergarten through Grade 7 and in Grades 9 through 11 exceeds 90%.

 

 

Met

The school has exceeded a 90% average retention rate over five years.  The school continues to meet that goal with 3 students in grades Kindergarten through 7 and 1 in grades 9-11 leaving at the end of the school year. 

 

 

 

Charter School Performance Criteria Relating to Organizational Viability

 

Complaints

There were no complaints received during the 2013-2014 school year. 

 

Budget and Finance Reports

Unaudited FY 2014 statement of revenues, expenses, and changes in net assets (income statement) 

Please see Attachment A

 

FY 2014 statement of net assets (balance sheet)

Please see Attachment B

 

FY 2015 approved school budget

Please see Attachment C

 

 

FY2015 Capital Plan

Our capital plan is to acquire our existing school building and surrounding land which we have occupied since 1996.  It is a 12,000 square foot building located on 6 acres in the town of West Tisbury, MA.  It meets our requirements our growing academic programs and has room to grow if needed.

The current owner has now projected the land and building to be for sale at a cost of  $ 1,400,000 in June of 2016.  Our goal is to purchase it for cash, thus eliminating our annual rent payments of $ 180,000.  This savings will allow us to maintain and possibly increase our educational programs in the arts and technology and also be able to retain and hire qualified teachers and staff. 

Our current Capital Project Reserve account is $ 900,000.  We hope to add to the reserve through fundraising to reach our goal.


 

Additional Information

Appendix C: School and Student Data Tables

 

 

Student demographic information can be found on the Department’s website using MVPCS’s profile. Below is the link to the MVPCS’s profile on the Department’s website.

 

http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/profiles/student.aspx?orgcode=04660550&orgtypecode=6&

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STUDENT DEMOGRAPHIC AND SUBGROUP INFORMATION

Race/Ethnicity

# of students

% of entire student body

African-American

18

10%

Asian

7

4%

Hispanic

6

3%

Native American

7

4%

White

142

79%

Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander

2

1%

Multi-race, non-Hispanic

*13

7%

Special education

33

18%

Limited English proficient

9

5%

Low income

47

26%

 

            *Thirteen of our students identified themselves through more than one category.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADMINISTRATIVE ROSTER FOR THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR

Name, Title

Brief Job Description

Start date

End date

(if no longer employed at the school)

Robert Moore,

Director

 

Responsible for the overall administrative and educational management of the school and effectively supporting staff in implementing the charter in a legally and programmatically responsible manner within broad policy guidelines and plans adopted by the MVPCS Board of Trustees, in compliance with Massachusetts General Laws.

 

July 1, 1998

 

Claudia Ewing,

Assistant Director

Responsible for assisting the Director with the overall administrative and educational management of the school, in compliance with Massachusetts General Laws.

 

July 1, 2005

 

Dan Secklecki,

Special Education Administrator

Responsible for working with the Director and Assistant Director to ensure that the school is in compliance with all Special Education Laws and regulations, and NCLB and 504 requirements.

September 1, 2012

June 30, 2014

Seth Mosler, Business Manager

Responsible for the overall financial management of the school in compliance with Charter School Office financial policies and MA General Laws.

July 1, 1996

 

 

 

TEACHERS AND STAFF ATTRITION FOR THE 2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR

 

Number as of the last day of the 2013-2014 school year

Departures during the 2013-2014 school year

Departures at the end of the school year

Teachers

34

0

3

Other Staff

12

0

1

In addition to completing this table, please provide a summary of the reasons for teacher and staff departures:

 

One assistant teacher left at the end of the school year to pursue a BA degree.  Another assistant teacher left at the end of the school year to move closer to take a teaching position out of state. A third assistant teacher left to pursue other opportunities.  The Director of Special Education retired. 

 

 

 

 



BOARD MEMBERS FOR THE 2013-14 SCHOOL YEAR

Name

Position on the Board

Committee affiliation(s)

Number of terms served

Length of each term (including date of election and expiration)

Maurice Reidy

President

 

2

7/1/09-6/30/12

7/1/12-6/30/15

Rubin Cronig

Treasurer

 

2

7/1/10-6/30/13

7/1/13-6/30/16

Philippe Jordi

 

Trusteeship

2

7/1/08-6/30/11

7/1/11-6/30/14

Pat Gregory

 

Technology

2

7/1/09-6/30/12

7/1/12-6/30/15

Ted Bayne

 

Technology

2

7/1/09-6/30/12

7/1/12-6/30/15

Linda Hughes

 

Trusteeship

1

7/1/11-6/30/14

Laura Caruso

 

 

1

7/1/11-6/30/14

Joan Richards

 

 

1

7/1/13-6/30/16

Nicholas Thayer

 

 

1

7/1/13-6/30/16

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix D: Additional Required Information

 

                Key Leadership Changes

Please make sure your district/school profile and directory administration is up-to-date with the correct names and contact information for key leaders. Please ask your school's directory administrator (see http://www.doe.mass.edu/infoservices/data/diradmin/list.aspx) to update this data in Directory Administration and please input any changes in this survey for the key positions listed below (and simply input "NA" if there is no change). Your directory administrator can contact Lee DeLorenzo at ldelorenzo@doe.mass.edu or 781-338-3227 for assistance.

 

Position

Name

Board of Trustees Chairperson

Maurice Reidy

Charter School Leader

NA

Assistant Charter School Leader

NA

Special Education Director

Daniel Seklecki

MCAS Test Coordinator

NA

SIMS Coordinator

NA

English Language Learner Director

NA

 

 

 

 

Enrollment

When is your estimated student application deadline and lottery date for students who are interested in enrolling for the 2015-2016 school year?

 

Action

Date(s)

Student Application Deadline

February 6

Lottery

February 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment A

Unaudited Income Statement Fiscal Year 2014

 

 

M.V.P.C.S.

Revenues and Expenditures Fiscal 2014

Unaudited

7/1/13-6/30/14

Ordinary Income/Expense

Income

001 STATE TUITION

3,949,377

002 GRANTS

Federal-140 SPED

3,693

Federal-240 SPED

31,333

Federal-274 SPED

1,500

Federal-305 Title I

35,328

Federal-REAPS

21,380

State-701 Kindergarten

11,600

Total 002 GRANTS

104,834

006 NUTRITION

Food Services

62,054

State, Federal  Reimbursement

22,659

Total 006 NUTRITION

84,713

009 STUDENT PROGRAMS

Activities

28,713

Field Trips

6,911

International Travel

21,458

Italy Trip

52,423

Total 009 STUDENT PROGRAMS

109,505

010 TRANSPORTATION AID

53,863

015 DONATIONS

1,550

016 BANK INTEREST

4,163

019 MISC REVENUE

3,746

Total Income

4,311,751

Expense

100 ADMINISTRATION

613,555

101 ADMIN. EXPENSE

76,335

220 TEACHERS-CLASSROOM, SPECLST

Classroom

987,342

Electives, Off., Arts Programs

36,637

Grants

104,834

Support Staff

535,805

Total 220 TEACHERS-CLASSROOM, SPECLST

1,664,618

230 TEACHING SERVICES

77,112

240 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

14,500

250 GUIDANCE, CONSULTANTS

91,486

260 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLIES

Arts, Electives, Offerings

9,008

Athletics

6,553

Books

10,306

Classroom Supplies

27,488

Computer Hardware, Software

58,466

Furniture, Equipment

23,066

Library, Media Center Supplies

1,473

Support Supplies

7,374

Total 260 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLIES

143,734

300 PUPIL SERVICES

Gym, Ktn, Mntr, Nurse Salaries

230,514

Kitchen Supplies, Food

62,068

Medical Supplies

3,882

Transportation

115,269

Total 300 PUPIL SERVICES

411,733

370 STUDENT PROGRAMS

Activities

53,254

Field Trip Exp.

11,577

International Travel

13,220

Italy Trip

53,352

Total 370 STUDENT PROGRAMS

131,403

400 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

Building/Grounds Lease

180,000

Maintenance

152,030

Network Infrastructure

30,965

Utilities

38,157

Total 400 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

401,152

500 PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS

1,104

501 INSURANCE

Dental Ins.

21,208

Health Ins.

437,339

Life, Disability

30,060

Property, Liability

8,589

State Unemp.

13,742

Student Ins.

3,510

Wrks. Comp.

10,277

Total 501 INSURANCE

524,725

502 EMPLOYER PAYROLL TAXES

72,261

Total Expense

4,223,718

Net Income

88,033

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment B

Balance Sheet Fiscal Year 2014

M.V.P.C.S.

Balance Sheet Fiscal 2014

 

Jun 30, 14

ASSETS

Current Assets

Checking/Savings

MV Savings General Account

1,054,982

MV Savings Money Market

224,712

MV Savings Payroll Account

38,125

MV Savings Vendor Account

685

PayPal/MC

12,336

TDBank Money Market

62,639

TDBank/VISA

14,056

Total Checking/Savings

1,407,535

Total Current Assets

1,407,535

Fixed Assets

Accumulated Depreciation

-107,906

Furniture & Equipment

353,870

Total Fixed Assets

245,964

TOTAL ASSETS

1,653,499

LIABILITIES & EQUITY

Equity

Capital Project Reserve

900,000

Invested in Capital Assets

265,096

Opening Bal Equity

1

Retained Earnings

400,367

Net Income

88,033

Total Equity

1,653,497

TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

1,653,497



 

 

Attachment C

Approved Budget for Fiscal Year 2015

M.V.P.C.S.

Budget  Fiscal 2015

7/1/14-6/30/15

Income

001 STATE TUITION

3,887,600

002 GRANTS

Federal-140 SPED

3,500

Federal-240 SPED

31,000

Federal-274 SPED

4,000

Federal-305 Title I

36,000

Federal-REAPS

20,000

State-701 Kindergarten

11,600

Total 002 GRANTS

106,100

006 NUTRITION

Food Services

65,000

State, Federal  Reimbursement

20,000

Total 006 NUTRITION

85,000

009 STUDENT PROGRAMS

Activities

25,000

Field Trips

12,000

International Travel

0

Italy Trip

0

Total 009 STUDENT PROGRAMS

37,000

010 TRANSPORTATION AID

38,000

015 DONATIONS

1,000

016 BANK INTEREST

3,000

019 MISC REVENUE

1,000

Total Income

4,158,700

Expense

100 ADMINISTRATION

564,000

101 ADMIN. EXPENSE

60,000

220 TEACHERS-CLASSROOM, SPECLST

Classroom

1,055,000

Electives, Off., Arts Programs

50,000

Grants

106,100

Support Staff

558,000

Total 220 TEACHERS-CLASSROOM, SPECLST

1,769,100

230 TEACHING SERVICES

67,500

240 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

15,000

250 GUIDANCE, CONSULTANTS

93,100

260 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLIES

Arts, Electives, Offerings

10,000

Athletics

5,000

Books

10,000

Classroom Supplies

20,000

Computer Hardware, Software

25,000

Furniture, Equipment

8,000

Library, Media Center Supplies

1,500

Support Supplies

7,500

Total 260 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLIES

87,000

300 PUPIL SERVICES

Gym, Ktn, Mntr, Nurse Salaries

239,000

Kitchen Supplies, Food

70,000

Medical Supplies

2,000

Transportation

110,000

Total 300 PUPIL SERVICES

421,000

370 STUDENT PROGRAMS

Activities

30,000

Field Trip Exp.

20,000

International Travel

0

Italy Trip

0

Total 370 STUDENT PROGRAMS

50,000

400 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

Building/Grounds Lease

180,000

Maintenance

150,000

Network Hardware

8,000

Utilities

40,000

Total 400 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

378,000

500 PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS

0

501 INSURANCE

Dental Ins.

22,000

Health Ins.

490,000

Life, Disability

28,500

Property, Liability

8,700

State Unemp.

14,000

Student Ins.

3,800

Wrks. Comp.

12,000

Total 501 INSURANCE

579,000

502 EMPLOYER PAYROLL TAXES

75,000

Total Expense

4,158,700

 

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